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Brooks, Kix - new to this town [2012]
Brooks & Dunn sind Geschichte, doch nach Ronnie Dunn kommt nun auch die andere Häfte des erfolgreichsten Country-Duos aller Zeiten mit einem Solo-Album! "New to this town" heisst das hervorragend gelungene Werk, mit dem Kix Brooks eindrucksvoll offenbart, was er auch ohne seinen kongenialen Partner in der Lage zu leisten ist. 12 starke Nummern, zumeist sehr kraftvoll und knackig in Szene gesetzt (der Balladen-Anteil ist klar in der Minderzahl), zwischen traditionellen Anlagen und sehr abwechslungsreichem, zuweilen durchaus rockigem New Country. Gast, Slide-Gitarrist und Duett-Partner beim Titelstück ust übrigens Joe Walsh (The Eagles). Die Musik passt durchaus zur Philosophie, die auch Brooks & Dunn verkörperten, hat aber auch ihren eigenen Pep. Die Melodien sind prima! Gratulation an Kix Brooks zu diesem großartigen Album!

Wen es interessiert: Hier im Original eine sehr ausführliche, aktuelle Biographie mit der Geschichte zum neuen Album im Original-Wortlaut:

"Wish I was new to this town
Just pullin’ in checking it out for the first time”
— “New to This Town” by Kix Brooks, Marv Green and Terry McBride

It’s been more than 30 years since Kix Brooks was new to the town that he made his home, where he married, raised two children and built an accomplished career as a songwriter, singer and half of the most successful duo in country music history, a weekly national radio show host, magazine columnist, film producer, actor, winery owner and active and influential member of the music industry and community at large.

And yet here he is, picking up where he started when he really was new to this town, when his very first solo single in 1983 lumbered up the country chart to #73 before being hijacked by gravity into oblivion.

“New to This Town” is the title cut from the album that he hopes will reintroduce him to music fans, not exactly as a brand new man—to borrow a phrase from a song he co-wrote many moons ago—but as his own man, with his own songs to sing and his own unique story to tell.
Though the song is about a romantic relationship, metaphorically it suggests another interpretation. “When you’re starting out, there’s so much fear that if you screw up or put out the wrong record, you’ve lost that chance to live your dream. At this point in my career, there’s a different kind of uncertainty and risk that the people who have seen me perform for 20 years as half of Brooks & Dunn won’t be able to see me as anything but that. So in that sense, being new to town would be good to be able to do again.”

Kix Brooks’ career as a musician began long before he came to Nashville, which is less than 100 miles from where the Louisiana native was shipped off for high school at Tennessee’s Sewanee Military Academy. “I wasn’t bad, but I wasn’t good,” he confesses with a smile. “The discipline was good for me. It gave me structure and problem-solving skills, which are really helpful for creative people.”

Brooks grew up in a musical family, had his first guitar before he hit his teens, and while in Sewanee, he began playing coffee houses with his roommate, Nashville native Jody Williams. “Jody turned me on to the Opry,” expanding the range of country music that Brooks already loved. “I was a fan of bluegrass, rock and outlaw country, people like Willie, Cash and Roger Miller. I loved the Allman Brothers, Leon Russell, the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Asleep at the Wheel, Guy Clark, Jerry Jeff Walker. ”
After graduation, he went to Louisiana Tech, gaining a foundational education in reading music and the theory of composition while getting hands-on experience playing clubs around town. Realizing that he wasn’t cut out to be in the marching band, school choir, or orchestra—which were required for a music degree—he switched his major to speech and got into theater, both of which would later serve him well.

A brief sabbatical from school led him to Alaska in 1976, working for his dad, a pipeline contractor. The job was great seed money, he recalls, “So when I got home, I bought a new car, a new guitar, a bottle of whiskey, and I was ready to get back at it.

“I had a band and I did some solo stuff. I could bang on a guitar and open up for just about anybody playing clubs in Shreveport. My plan was to be somebody.”
But an invitation from his sister put “Plan A” on hold. “She called me out of the blue and asked if I would come to Maine and help her with a television production company. So I was doing radio and television production, commercials, and it was a great experience. But I was also playing clubs and was still drawn to that. I enjoyed advertising, I enjoyed Maine. But in my heart of hearts, I just wanted to play music.”

So he took off again for Louisiana but stopped in Nashville to visit with his old roommate Jody Williams. “We stayed up all night talking and playing music, and Jody tried to talk me into staying. He said I could make a living writing songs. I said, ‘A, you’re nuts, and B, I’m going to New Orleans to play music.’”
But as fun as it was, the pace—and the partying—began to take a toll. “I called Jody up and said, ‘Do you really think I could make a living writing songs?’ and he said, ‘Get your ass up here!’”

True to his word, Williams gave Brooks a place to crash and found him a job with a concert production company while arranging meetings for him with music publishers around town.

“Everybody was really nice for about half a song, and then I wrote some more songs and called them back, and everyone was always out to lunch. So I started breaking songs down and figuring out what these guys were doing, which doesn’t mean you can do it, but at least I did my homework and really started working harder at trying to figure out how to do it. I realized it was one thing to make people smile in bars and another thing to make a living as a songwriter in Nashville.”
His hard work paid off, and less than two years after pulling into town, Brooks had a publishing deal and a #1 cut. Some things didn’t pan out, like his first album in 1983 on a label that went defunct before the album was released and a 1989 album on Capitol that went nowhere fast.
But he was making a living—a good living—writing songs for Tree Publishing, where exec Paul Worley took some of his demos to veteran music man Tim DuBois, head of the Arista Nashville record label. DuBois suggested that Brooks write with the winner of a talent competition, a tall, big-voiced Texan named Ronnie Dunn. When DuBois heard their song demos, the rest became Brooks & Dunn history.

In their 20-year ride, the duo recorded 10 studio albums, released 50 singles, scored 23 #1 hits, sold more than 30 million albums, sold out tours from coast to coast and became one of the most awarded acts in country music history.

But in August of 2009, they revealed what had long been a topic between the partners themselves: that after a final tour and a final compilation album, Brooks & Dunn would be no more.

“It was always an arranged marriage that happened to work out really well and produce some great kids. But after 20 amazing, dream-like years, it was time.”
As for the notion of recording a solo album, Brooks took his time—or as much time as realistic for someone who owns a thriving winery, hosts a weekly syndicated radio show, forms a film production company, takes on roles in three movies and writes all but one of the songs for the soundtrack for the western To Kill a Memory, as well as co-writing the soundtrack for a Christmas movie.

“I have a lot of interests, and I wasn’t at that point thinking of what I would do next. I was kind of looking forward to chilling for a year or so. I wanted to take my time. I started writing during the last B&D tour, and when we got done, I kept writing while we were making movies.”
When the time felt right, Brooks approached his album with customary enthusiasm, producing and recording nearly 50 songs before beginning the challenging process of narrowing the field. “There were a few like [the Brooks/Leslie Satcher co-write] ‘Moonshine Road’ that I was sort of building the album around,” he says, “so you try to take the ones that fit the other songs the best, that fit you best, or where the track is just smoking.”

The result is a record that is emphatically and uniquely Kix Brooks—rocking, smoky, swampy and bluesy, with belts of bayou and hits of Cajun zydeco. Nine of the album’s dozen tracks bear Brooks’ name as a co-writer, collaborating with such longtime friends and writing luminaries as Bob DiPiero and David Lee Murphy (on the lyrically clever “Closin’ Time at Home”), Rhett Akins and Dallas Davidson (for the mid-tempo musical celebration of “Bring It on Home”), and Marv Green and Terry McBride on “New to This Town,” the title track single that almost didn’t make the album.

“We were kind of done with everything, I had recorded the album, and Jay DeMarcus and I were doing the soundtrack for a Christmas movie over at his house. But I was thinking about that song, so he was nice enough to help me produce it and let me use the pickers while we were working there. He really liked the song, so I said, ‘Let’s do it together.’”

Later, “The engineer from my radio show said, ‘You ought to get some Joe Walsh-sounding slide on that.’ I’m like, ‘Hmm, what if I could get Joe Walsh?’ My manager is partners with Irving Azoff, who sent it to Joe, and he called me up and put the slide on there for me. So that worked out great.”
In a new-to-this-town, full-circle touch, the album also features two songs that Brooks wrote with Rafe Van Hoy. With Deborah Allen, they penned Brooks’ first #1 as a songwriter (John Conlee’s ’83 chart-topper, “I’m Only in It for the Love”), and they pair here on the backsliding fun of “Complete 360” and team with Curly Putman on the groove-and-soul-filled, after-hours portrait of “my baby’s” “Tattoo.”

Now, with his album complete, Brooks is just looking forward to getting it into the hands of fans and resuming the solo career that began long ago when his entire plan “was to be somebody.”

“That fear I had at one point in my career where you’re scared to death to make the wrong move, I don’t feel that way now. But you still really want to do something that is relevant and makes people rock, and look out at a crowd and know you have connected, you’ve hit that nerve. I don’t think you ever get over that.”

(This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.)

Das komplette Tracklisting:

1. New to this Town - 4:20
2. Moonshine Road - 4:21
3. Bring It On Home - 3:44
4. There's the Sun - 3:05
5. Complete 360 - 3:16
6. My Baby - 2:55
7. Tattoo - 3:25
8. In the Right Place - 3:47
9. Next to That Woman - 3:21
10. Let's Do This Thing - 2:57
11. Closin' Time at Home - 3:37
12. She Knew I Was a Cowboy - 3:22

Art-Nr.: 7907
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Country
Status: Programm || Typ: CD || Preis: € 13,90

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Civil Wars, The - same [2013]
Sehnlichst erwartetes Follow-Up des grandiosen Americana-/Singer-Songwriter-/Alternative Country-/Folk Rock-Duos Joy Williams und John Paul White zu dem mit 3 Grammys dekorierten, frenetisch gefeierten Debut "Barton hollow". The Civil Wars machen genau da weiter, wo sie mit ihrem Vorgänger aufgehört haben. Songmaterial und Performance sind exzellent!

Kurze Original-Produktinfo:
The Civil Wars' highly anticipated sophomore self-titled album is the follow up to the three-time Grammy Award-winning duo's acclaimed debut, Barton Hollow.
The Civil Wars was recorded in Nashville between August 2012 and January 2013. Charlie Peacock was once again at the helm as producer for the album. Additionally, Rick Rubin produced the duo's performance for the track "I Had Me a Girl" in August of 2011. Peacock later completed the track by producing the instrumentation and mix.

Exklusives "Track by Track"-Review zu allen Stücken des Albums von Joy Williams:

THE ONE THAT GOT AWAY

This song pays homage to regret. Nearly everybody I've come across has somebody in their life that they wonder what life would be like if they'd never met that person. It's that sliding-door moment -- in the blink of an eye everything could change. Either for the positive or the negative.
John Paul and I wrote this song in the screened-in porch of my and Nate's new home. I remember warm breezes blowing, a mild day. I had recently had my son, Miles, who happened to be asleep with Nate in the living room, right next to the porch. I remember asking John Paul to play quietly so he didn't wake up the baby.

I HAD ME A GIRL

This song always conjures up an image of a glass of whiskey and a lit cigarette. It's a little brooding. A little dangerous. It smolders. It has swagger and grit. It's full of innuendo and Southern Gothic tones. I love the feel of this track, and the way this song came together on the record. "I Had Me a Girl" is one of those musical moments that makes me wish I knew how to play electric guitar. Or any guitar, for that matter.

SAME OLD SAME OLD

This song, to me, represents the ache of monogamy. This isn't an "I'm leaving you" song. It's a vulnerable confession of "I don't want to leave. I want to work on this -- with you." Having said that, someone once told me a story about long-term relationships: to think of them as a continent to explore. I could spend a lifetime backpacking through Africa, and I would still never know all there is to know about that continent. To stay the course, to stay intentional, to stay curious and connected -- that's the heart of it. But it's so easy to lose track of the trail, to get tired, to want to give up, or to want a new adventure. It can be so easy to lose sight of the goodness and mystery within the person sitting right in front of you. That continent idea inspires me, and makes the ache when it comes hurt a little less. To know that it happens to all of us. What I'm realizing now is that sometimes the "same old same old" can actually be rich, worthwhile and a great adventure.

DUST TO DUST

This song is an anthem for the lonely. Sometimes you come across somebody who thinks they are hiding their pain, but if we are all honest, nobody is very good at it. "You're like a mirror, reflecting me. Takes one to know one, so take it from me.” When John Paul and I wrote this late one night in Birmingham, England, we decided to change the pronoun at the end of the song. We wanted to represent that we all experience loneliness in our lives.

EAVESDROP

We brought in our producer, Charlie Peacock, on this song. He helped with arrangements and really helped take the song to a totally different place. Sometimes as an artist, you can't see what needs re-arranging when you're so "in it." Charlie brought perspective. Almost like an eavesdrop within an "Eavesdrop."
Strangely enough, this song always reminds me that my voice has changed since the last album. I have my son to thank for that, truly. When I was first pregnant and performing on the road, I thought something was wrong with my voice. I was having a hard time hitting high notes, while my low notes kept getting deeper and deeper. I did some research with the help of a vocal coach, and learned that hormone levels affect a female singing range. Having a boy, naturally, upped my testosterone levels, making low notes easier to hit and higher notes harder to reach. But the great thing? After having Miles, I regained my high range AND have kept my low range. Pregnancy literally changed the makeup of my vocal cords. There's a different timbre to it now, and I love that I can hear the story of my son in my singing.

DEVIL'S BACKBONE

This song is our take on an Americana murder ballad. It's dark, prickly, anxious. It was fun writing because we just imagined some dust-bowl scenario, a broke-down town, and a man awaiting being hung for something he did in the name of trying to provide for his family. The woman who loves him is watching him standing there on the gallows.
This song always reminds me of when the melody first came to mind. I was doing my makeup in the tiled bathroom upstairs, with my newborn Miles in a yellow rocking bassinet next to me. I started singing, and turned on the voice memo app on my iPhone so I wouldn't forget it. As I sang, Miles started cooing along with me. Not on pitch, mind you, but I'd move a note, and he'd move a note. I'm never deleting that voice memo. It's become one of my favorites.

FROM THIS VALLEY

That's our Grand Ole Opry song. A new spiritual. It's actually the oldest song written on the album. We wrote it before Barton Hollow came out. Even though we didn't have our own recording of it, we started performing it live and it became a fan favorite. It made sense to finally put it on an album. One of my favorite moments on stage every night was singing the a cappella part together.

TELL MAMA

We recorded the performance at Fame studio in Muscle Shoals, a place we'd written a few songs before that made it onto Barton Hollow. I always felt the musical ghosts in that studio, one of whom was the great Etta James. We're a band that's known for covering songs live in our own way, and we thought it would be fun to take a stab at "Tell Mama." I found out later that where we recorded was the same room she recorded her version. That might explain why I kept getting goosebumps.

OH HENRY

We wrote it one week before Barton Hollow, in the mountains of Salt Lake City during our first Sundance Festival. We conjured up a story about a woman who was married to a philandering man. She is begging her man to level with her, and letting him know she can only take so much, a la "it's gonna kill me or it's gonna kill you."

DISARM

Again, we're the band who loves to do covers. Both John Paul and I have always been huge Smashing Pumpkins fans. Nate mentioned it might be a cool cover, and we actually wound up working it out the same day that we wrote "Oh Henry" up in Salt Lake City for Sundance. It turned into another on-stage staple that people asked for every night. We found out later from his then-manager that Billy dug it.

SACRED HEART

We wrote this song in a flat in Paris, with the Eiffel Tower in full view on a cold night. Tall windows, Victorian furniture, and somehow the atmosphere of all of that seeped into the song. Nate and our friends were there in the room as we wrote, all of us drinking wine together. I also loved getting to try out my flawed French. I wrote what words I knew in French, and then had a Parisian friend named Renata Pepper (yes, that's her real name) look it over later and help me translate. When we recorded the song for the album, I called in a French professor from Vanderbilt named Becky Peterson, who has now become a good friend.

D'ARLINE

We wrote this song in the studio behind my house in Nashville, on a warm summer day, with the windows and doors open. This song is a sweet lament, of loss and the belief that you'll never be able to love anybody else again. I stumbled across "Letters of Note" on Twitter, and was struck by the title of a letter written by a famous physicist named Richard Feynman: "I love my wife. My wife is dead." A little over a year after her death, he wrote his wife a love letter and sealed it. It was written in 1946, and wasn't opened until after his death in 1988. He ended his note to his long-lost wife with "Please excuse my not mailing this -- but I don't know your new address."
Another aside to this song: While we were recording the song together, John Paul and I could hear crows cawing in the background that I've since named Edgar, Allen and Poe. This recording and performance of the song is the first and only in existence, a work tape recorded simply on my iPhone.

Das komplette Tracklisting:

1. The One That Got Away - 3.32
2. I Had Me a Girl - 3.45
3. Same Old Same Old - 3.48
4. Dust to Dust - 3.49
5. Eavesdrop - 3.35
6. Devil's Backbone - 2.29
7. From This Valley - 3.33
8. Tell Mama - 3.48
9. Oh Henry - 3.32
10. Disarm - 4.42
11. Sacred Heart - 3.19
12. D'Arline - 3.06

Art-Nr.: 8264
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Rock; Country
Status: Programm || Typ: CD || Preis: € 13,90

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Evans, Sara - words [2017]
Klasse neues Album von Sara Evans. Nach vielen Turbulenzen, sowohl im privaten, als auch musikalischen Bereich, hat sich Sara Evans von ihrem bisherigen Major-Label getrennt und veröffentlich "Words" nun auf ihrem eigenen Label "Born To Fly", vertrieben von einem unabhängigen Distributor. Die neu gewonnene, musikalische Freiheit bekommt ihr hörbar gut, denn ihr neues Werk wirkt frisch und unverbraucht. Sie spielt genau die Songs, die sie spielen möchte, frei von jedem Mainstream- und Erfolgsdruck, einfach nur der Musik willen. Das gelingt großartig.. Bester Country/ New Country einer erstklassigen Sängerin mit neu gewonnener musikalischer Freihet. Stark!

Hier noch ein Originbal U,S.-Review zu dieser klasse Veröffentlichung:

Sara Evans returns after three years away with 14 new songs to showcase who she is as a mother, wife, lover, fighter and business woman. Chasing the mainstream can be a hard thing for a successful artist when they have had a handful of hits and released records which cracked the mainstream zeitgeist. Like Lee Ann Rimes did with Remnants earlier this year, Sara Evans has decided to independently release Words on her own label (Born To Fly Records) and it finds her refreshed and sounding better than she did on her past couple of releases (even if she did get one more great hit in "A Little Bit Stronger" from that era). Instead of chasing whatever sounds the mainstream has, we have Sara in contemplative balladeer mode throughout the Majority of Words and this is truly where Sara and her distinctive alto shine.
Midtempo "Diving In Deep" reminds me of Paul Simon's "Graceland" musically with some afro-centric percussive melodies serving as the anchor for Sara Evans to sing about falling in love with all the gusto that we always do when in a relationship ("when all is fair in love in war, the consequence I will ignore because this time I'm diving in deep," she sings). "I Don't Trust Myself" is a moody song about being self-aware enough to not fall back into old routines while "I Want You" is a sweet, soaring alternative to "I Don't Trust Myself." Fans of the earlier catalog from Sara Evans, will certainly find moments to enjoy here with the rootsy "Make Room At The Bottom" (co-written by Ashley Monroe), "I'm On My Way" and album opener "Long Way Down" while "Marquee Sign," one of three songs co-written by Sara Evans herself, showcase the singer's pen is still sharp. The song also showcases harmonies from her daughter Olivia. The title track, "Words," feels like a long-lost Emmylou song and "Night Light" features family harmony from Sara Evans three siblings Matt, Lesley and Ashley. Finally, "Letting You Go," is a song any parent can relate to as they watch their children grow up and go away and become adults themselves. It's a beautiful song and a strong closer (though, really, the acoustic version of "A Little Bit Stronger" serves as the real closer here).
It's often hard for stars to know when the time is right to stop chasing mainstream radio and it gets even harder for them to do that if they strive for a career in the independent realm. On some ways, you could listen to Sara Evans new, independently-released Words album and feel like she's chasing a train she'll never catch but the reality is that this is a record for a fans and if she does get some mainstram radio success, awesome, but if not, that's OK too because, hits or not, Words is the record of her career. (Matt Bjorke/Roughstock)

Das komplette Tracklisting:

1. Long Way Down - 4:14
2. Marquee Sign - 4:01
3. Diving in Deep - 2:36
4. All the Love You Left Me - 4:17
5. Like the Way You Love Me - 3:05
6. Rain and Fire - 3:38
7. Night Light - 3:38
8. I Need a River - 4:22
9. I Don't Trust Myself - 3:34
10. Make Room at the Bottom - 3:12
11. Words - 2:48
12. I Want You - 3:41
13. Letting You Go - 4:11
14. A Little Bit Stronger (Acoustic Version) - 4:38

Art-Nr.: 9478
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Country
Status: Programm || Typ: CD || Preis: € 14,90

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Lynn, Loretta - still woman enough [2021]
"Still woman enough" - was für ein Lebenszeichen der rüstigen, immer "Jungen", mittlerweile 88-jährigen, amerikanischen Country-Ikone Loretta Lynn. Auf ihrem 50. Studioalbum (ohne die diversesten Duett-Alben mit Conway Twitty) feiert Lynn mit 13 exzellenten, puren, traditionellen, lupenreinen Roots-Countrynummern die "Women In Country Music". Das geht von der Hommage an Mother Maybell Carter and the Carter Family mit ihrem Cover von deren Evergren "Keep on the sunny side", über einige wunderbare Neukompositionen, wie z. B. dem mit ihrer Tochter Patsy geschriebenen Titelstück "Still woman enough" (eingespielt gemeinsam mit den Superstars Reba McEntire und Carrie Underwood), "One's on the way" (gemeinsam mit Margo Price) und "You ain't woman enough" (mit Tanya Tucker), bis hin zu frischen Neuinterpretationen ihrer allerersten Single "Honky Tonk girl" und dem emotionalen, biografischen "Coal Miner's Daughter (Recitation)", mit dem sie den 50. Jahrestag der Veröffentlichung (5. Oktober 1970) ihres berühmtesten Songs überhaupt zelebriert. Einfach eine tolle Leistung von Loretta Lynn!

Das komplette Tracklisting:

1. Still Woman Enough - (feat. Reba McEntire and Carrie Underwood) - 3:37
2. Keep On The Sunny Side - 2:55
3. Honky Tonk Girl - 2:32
4. I Don't Feel At Home Anymore - 2:03
5. Old Kentucky Home - 2:27
6. Coal Miner's Daughter (Recitation) - 2:07
7. One's On The Way (feat. Margo Price) - 2:41
8. I Wanna Be Free - 2:15
9. Where No One Stands Alone - 2:47
10. I'll Be All Smiles Tonight - 3:38
11. I Saw The Light - 3:06
12. My Love - 2:44
13. You Ain't Woman Enough (feat. Tanya Tucker) - 2:17

Art-Nr.: 10273
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Country
Status: Neuheit || Typ: CD || Preis: € 15,90

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McBride, Martina - timeless [2005]
Wunderbar! Ein durch und durch reines, vollkommen traditionelles Album, mit dem Martina McBride einfach mal die Zeiger der "Countrymusic-Uhren" um 30, 40 oder 50 Jahre zurückdreht! "Timeless" ist ihre hinreißende Hommage an zeitlose, unvergeßliche Country-Klassiker, von denen sie hier 18 Titel in bravouröser, ungemein authentischer Manier neu eingespielt hat. "I've always wanted to make a traditional country album. It has always been in my heart to do a record like this", sagt Martina über "Timeless". Dabei war es ihr extrem wichtig Musiker zu finden, die an dieses Projekt mit der gleichen Intension herangehen, wie sie selbst. Diese fand sie in Leuten wie der Steelguitar-Ikone Paul Franklin, Fiddler Stuart Duncan, Bassist Glenn Worf, Tastenmann Gordon Mote, Drummer Eddie Bayers und den Gitarristen Steve Gbson, Paul Worley und Marty Schiff. In dieser Gemeinschaft ging man mit großem Enthusiasmus und großer Freude an die Aufnahme-Sessions in den Blackbird-Studios von Nashville, erarbeitete gemeinsam die Arrangements und spielte die Stücke anschließend über weite Passagen hinweg live ein. "It was an organic, simpel, old-fashioned process", bemerkt Martina dazu, die das Album im übrigen selbst produzierte. Steelguitars, pure Country-Gitarren, Fiddles und viel Honky Tonk-Atmosphäre bestimmen das Geschehen! Die Songs: "You win again" (im Original von Hank Williams), in einem herrlichen "Old School"-Gewand mit nostalgischer, hawaiianisch klingender Steelguitar und schöner Fiddle, der flotte Honky Tonker "I'll be there" (Ray Price) mit den Gästen Rhonda Vincent und DanTyminski, eine ergreifende Fassung von "I can't stop loving you" (Don Gibson) mit wimmernder Steel, Lynn Anderson's 1970iger Mega-Hit "Rose garden" (ist die erste Single des Albums), Merle Haggard's "Today I started loving you again", Loretta Lynn's "You ain't woman enough", "Once a day" (im Original gesungen von Connie Smith), Harlan Howard's "Pick me up on your way down" (u.a. gesungen von Charlie Walker), "I don't hurt anymore" (Hank Snow), Buddy Holly's "True love ways", Tammy Wynette's "'Til I can make it on my own", Johnny Cash's "I still miss someone", in einem tollen Bluegrass angehauchten Arrangement mit Dobro, Mandoline und Fiddle, sowie Dolly Parton als Gesangs-Gast, "Heartaches by the number" (im Original von Ray Price), mit Dwight Yoakam als Gast, "Satin sheets" (Jeanne Pruett), "Thanks a lot" (Ernest Tubb), "Love's gonna live here" (Buck Owens), Hank Cochran's "Make the world go away" (im Original gesungen von Eddie Arnold), und zum Schluß einer wunderschöne Version von Kris Kristofferson's "Help me make it through the night"! Martina McBride hat diese Klassiker auf beeindruckende Weise revitalisiert, hat ihnen frischen Wind eingehaucht und ihren "Zeitlos"-Charakter noch mehr untermauert, ohne dabei auf diesen herrlichen Charme der "old-fashioned" Ursprünglichkeit zu verzichten. Und sie singt wie eine "Göttin"! Diese Lieder sind unsterblich - für immer! Wer pure, traditionelle, "richtige" Countrymusic liebt, kommt an diesem Album nicht vorbei!

Art-Nr.: 3664
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Country
Status: Programm || Typ: CD || Preis: € 16,90

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McEntire, Reba - keep on loving you [2009]
Reba's neue... - und es ist wieder ein prima Album geworden. Reba McEntire ist eine großartige Künstlerin, die es problemlos versteht, sich den Gegebenheiten des modernen Nashville's anzupassen, ohne auch nur im geringsten ihre Wurzeln zu leugnen. Genau das ist ihr hier bestens gelungen. So ist "Keep on loving you" ein modernes, überwiegend schön knackiges, kraftvolles Country-/New Country-/Contemporary Country-Album geworden, das typisch Reba ist, und eindrucksvoll offenbart, dass die Diva in Nashville's Gegenwart angekommen ist. Klasse!

Reba hat zu jedem einzelnen Stück des neuen Albums ein paar Gedanken und Statements preis gegeben, die wir nachstehend im Originaltext weitergeben:

1. "Strange" (Wendell Mobley, Jason Sellers, Neil Thrasher)
"I liked the way it has a lot of different melodies to it. It has great range, but the main reason I like it is because it's so sassy. I love the attitude of it. It's totally different, but it reminds me of the attitudes of `Can't Even Get the Blues.' I seem to have success with sassy attitude songs. This song is about a woman who has been left behind from her partner or boyfriend, and she is trying to feel sad, but it's just not working, so she's going on with her life. It's a strong woman song."

2. "Just When I Thought I'd Stopped Loving You" (Mark Nesler, Rivers Rutherford)
"This is the song that Rivers Rutherford wrote with Mark Nesler. I loved the beat and the melody. It reminded me of a Rascal Flatts song in the first part of it. It's really catchy. It's a song that I'd be singing the middle of the night when I woke up, so I knew it would be a great song when it is in your subconscious like that. I would say this is the least powerful woman song, because she is like, `Oh, I can't give in and take you back one more time, I can't,' but then she does. I hate to say it's a booty call song, but it does remind me of that. I guess this is my booty call song!"

3. "I Keep On Lovin' You" (Ronnie Dunn, Terry McBride)
"We were in the studio recording with Tony Brown, and Tony had said they were just finishing up some of the Brooks & Dunn songs. He said, `You ought to listen to this one song. I just love the song. I think it is wonderful. I think it can relate to a couple who have been together for a short time or a long time, but basically a long time. We've been through the highs and lows and ups and downs, we've fought and gotten back together, but no matter what we go through, I'm going to keep on loving you. I think it's an anniversary song."

4. "I Want a Cowboy" (Katrina Elam, Wayne Kirkpatrick, Jimmie Lee Sloas)
"Katrina Elam co-wrote this song. I am a huge fan of Katrina Elam. She is one of the best singers I've ever heard. I asked Tony to ask Katrina if I could cut `I Want a Cowboy.' She came in and sang some of the harmony on it too. It's a great kick-ass song that is good attitude. And I'm a cowgirl; I've rodeoed 10 years and I'm a third-generation rodeo brat, so I thought it was just perfect."

5. "Consider Me Gone" (Steve Diamond, Marv Green)
"It's a strong woman song. I'm sure there are tons of women who get the cold shoulder when the husband comes in from work. He's had a rough day and she's had three kids at home, especially if it's summer. He doesn't want to talk, something's going on and it's confrontation time. If you are giving me the cold shoulder, if you're not wanting to talk to me, and if things aren't getting any better and if I don't turn you on, consider me gone. Here's the way the cow eats the cabbage. It's like, let's poop or get off the pot. Tell it like it is. It's a pretty cool song and it's confrontation time. That is one thing that is wrong with relationships, that there's not enough communication."

6. "But Why" (Jason Sellers, Neil Thrasher)
"I love the melody. It's one of those love songs that I usually don't record. It's also a strong woman song: `I can do this by myself, but why would I want to when I can share it with you?' It's a real sweet love song. It's a very soft song."

7. "Pink Guitar" (Ed Hill, Jamie O'Neal, Shaye Smith)
"This is just a kick-ass fun song. I can see lots of little girls going, `Yeah, I want to play guitar.' When I was growing up, guitars were for boys; that was the men's instrument, especially an electric guitar. Girls could play an acoustic guitar. I remember the girl who played on one of the awards shows with Carrie Underwood. She got out there and played her butt off. That was when I found `Pink Guitar.' I said, `She's going to love this song.' I love the attitude of it. It's still country; it's almost like `Fancy.' This girl had this dream and she went on to survive and succeed. It's real cute and I love to sing it."

8. "She's Turning 50 Today" (Liz Hengber, Tommy Lee James, Reba McEntire)
"It's a song about a woman who found out that her husband left on Saturday for a woman who is half her age. She spent the day lying in bed, but then on Monday got up, loaded up her pickup truck and began a new chapter of her life. She went on with her life and didn't look back. I wrote the first two lines of `She's Turning 50 Today' and sent it to Liz Hengber. I said, `Why don't you work on this a little bit and email me back what you've got?' Two years went by, and I said, `Liz, what about that song?' She said, `Tommy Lee James and I are going to work on it. So by the time this album came around to start recording, they sent me an MP3 of it while I was in the studio. I rewrote the second verse to make it more personal and relate to me when I left Stringtown, Oklahoma, in 1987. So in a way it's about me leaving a relationship, but it was certainly years ago, but put the two together."

9. "Eight Crazy Hours (In the Story of Love)" (Leslie Satcher, Darrell Scott) "This is a song I was on the fence about because it was so deep that I just didn't know how to take it. And so I let Autumn McEntire Sizemore, my niece, listen to it. She started crying and said, `You've got to record this song.' I let more people listen to it and they were like, `Oh my gosh!' It didn't hit me as hard as it did a lot of other people. I guess I haven't had to get away. I think my music is my release. Whenever I am menopausal or whatever, I can release things in my music when I sing. That is my therapy. It touched so many people that I recorded it. When I sang it live it choked me up so much that I couldn't get through it. This woman has a meltdown and she is just putting sheets on the bed and winds up in a bunch of dirty clothes on the floor, crying her eyes out. She checks into a cheap motel and lets it all out, crying in the bathtub. It was just as simple as picking up the kids and she's back in life again. She just needed to go away and take time for herself. Eight hours later, they're sitting around table eating chicken and laughing. It's eight crazy hours and the story of love."

10. "Nothing To Lose" (Kim Fox)
"Nothing to Lose" was on Melonie Cannon's album. When I was working with (Melonie's father) Buddy Cannon years ago, he gave it to me. I love Melonie's voice. `Nothing to Lose' was one of those songs that I said, `Man, if I could ever record that...,' so I did. I told everybody, `I want to feature the band on this,' so we let the band play two or three times. Everybody had an instrumental. It's about a woman leaving on the bus going down to Georgia. She doesn't know where she's going and doesn't know what lies ahead, but she doesn't care. It's another strong woman song."

11. "Over You" (Michael Dulaney, Steven Dale Jones, Jason Sellers)
"Whew! That is a sad song, kind of like Anne Steele. It's a beautiful melody. (My husband) Narvel said he loved this song. He would play the demo over and over. It's just one of those about `I knew the day would come when we would see each other again. You look great and got on with your life, but I'm still not over you.' It's really sad."

12. "Maggie Creek Road" (Karen Rochelle, James Slater)
"We were in the studio and I was having trouble with my resonance; I wasn't getting my soft voice at all. During lunch I saw Dr. Richard Quisling, my throat doctor in Nashville, and he opened up my sinuses or resonances or something. I came back to the studio and started singing again and Tony Brown's mouth dropped open, `My gosh, what did he do to you?' `He lasered out a little infection.' I put Dr. Quisling on my album thanks-yous. He is just a miracle worker. I had been on the fence about this song, but Tony really wanted me to record it. While I was coming back in, I said, `Let's do `Maggie Creek Road' next,' and he said, `Yes!' It's about this woman who has a daughter that is almost déjà vu for this mother. The little girl is leaving with evidently an older man on a date. This is what happened to the mother 20 years ago. She isn't going to let history repeat itself, so she follows them. They are parked down by the river and she opens the door and takes care of the situation. As the song says, `You don't want to see Mama go to war.' Mama was protecting her daughter. It's one of those swampy Louisiana songs with that feel."

13. "I'll Have What She's Having" (Jimmy Melton, Georgia Middleman)
"This is a cute song. I loved it the first time I heard it. They had horns on it and I said, `Of course we'll change it to fiddle and steel guitar.' It's real sassy. A woman is walking into a bar and she's looking for a man. She sees a woman having a good time, dancing with a man. `I'll have what she's having... and by the way, that looks hot.' We'll have fun with it onstage."

Das komplette Tracklisting:

1 Strange - 3:00   
2 Just When I Thought I'd Stopped Loving You - 3:50   
3 I Keep on Lovin' You - 3:13   
4 I Want a Cowboy - 3:39   
5 Consider Me Gone - 3:38   
6 But Why - 3:28   
7 Pink Guitar - 2:53   
8 She's Turning 50 Today - 4:05   
9 Eight Crazy Hours (In the Story of Love) - 4:04   
10 Nothing to Lose - 4:47   
11 Over You - 3:56   
12 Maggie Creek Road - 4:50   
13 I'll Have What She's Having - 2:59

Art-Nr.: 6516
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Country
Status: Programm || Typ: CD || Preis: € 16,90

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Runaway June - blue roses [2019]
Großartiges, erfrischendes Debutalbum von Runaway June, einem Mädels-Trios aus Nashville/TN, bestehend aus Naomi Cooke (lead vocals and guitar), Hannah Mulholland (vocals and mandolin) und Jennifer Wayne (vocals and guitar). Ausgestattet mit immensem gesanglichen Potential (die Harmonie-Gesänge sind wundervoll) präsentieren diese "Countrygirls" eine mit viel Hit-Potential ausgestattete Mischung aus gut gelauntem, von tollen Melodien und sehr schönen Arrangements geprägtem (vorwiegend in knackigem Gitarrensound), musikalisch exzellent dargebotenem New Country und Country-Pop, glücklicherweise ohne aufgesetzte, Genre-fremde Schnörkel. Das ist weitestgehend handgemachte Musik, bei der die absolute Studioelite Nashville's am Start ist, wie etwa Dan Dugmore, Ross Copperman, Tom Bukovac, Dann Huff (der auch produzierte) Tony Lucido, Nir Z, Ilya Toshinsky, und, und, und. Die Songs gehen riunter wie Öl, sorgen unweigerlich für gute Laune und ein "sonniges" Gemüt. Enthält u. a. eine sehr starke Coverversion von Dwight Yoakam's großem Hit "Fast as you". Herrlich auch das wunderbare Titelstück "Blue roses", eine waschechte, lupenreine Countryballade mit zeitlos schöner Melodie. Die Drei überzeugen auf ganzer Linie. Tolle Musik für die Fans solcher Bands und Kolleginnen wie Little Big Town, Pistol Annies, Lady Antebellum, Jennifer Nettles und Sugarland, und vsicher auch der guten, alten Dixie Chicks.

Hier noch ein Original U.S.-Review:

Country trio Runaway June are comprised of r. Naomi Cooke on lead vocals and guitar; Hannah Mulholland on vocals and mandolin and Jennifer Wayne on vocals and guitar. The girls have become the first all female trio to gain two country top 40 hits in a decade and their new album Blue Roses is released in the same month as their name – a fitting choice for a light and fun summer album of sweet country pop.
Opener Head Over Heels is a fresh and feisty break up song about getting over someone – a kind of New Rules for the country genre. Then we have their hit Buy Your Own Drinks, which brings some Miranda Lambert level of sass to the album. It’s a great song, an independent women drinking anthem which has even done well at country radio – a miracle in this day and age.
We Were Rich is a lovely moment, showing a more vulnerable side to the group. The song is drenched in the nostalgia of childhood, telling stories of growing up poor but happy. This is one of the few songs on the album not written by the band but they sell it like it’s their own story. Maybe a rootsier production style would have silenced the genre purists but it’s engaging nevertheless.
Got Me Where I Want You shows off their beautiful harmonies. Trouble With This Town enlists songwriting help from Liz Rose, and the results are catchy and reminiscent of Carrie Underwood, who the band have been supporting on tour recently.
The choice to cover Dwight Yoakam’s Fast As You should be applauded, showing these girls care about honouring the greats of country genre. In their hands it’s a sassy slice of fun, with some sweet banjo making it one of the most enjoyable moments on the album.
Blue Roses is a classic country ballad, a wistful moment of sadness to finish the album using the central flower metaphor to lovely effect. Dolly herself would be proud to sing this one.
My only concern for Runaway June is that we are working in a social media age where personality helps to sell the music so when you’re a group it is harder for your audience to get to connect with you individually. Compared to groups like Pistol Annies, I’m With Her and The Highwoman who were known personalities first, you feel Runaway June are playing catch up a little. Still with the return of the Dixie Chicks imminent maybe the time for the revival of great country girl groups is now.
Blue Roses is an enjoyable debut album and there there is much potential here. I hope that country music gives this band enough attention to allow them to gain success they deserve. (Michelle Lindsey / Highway Queens)

Das komplette Tracklisting:

1. Head Over Heels - 3:09
2. Buy My Own Drinks - 3:26
3. We Were Rich - 3:38
4. I Know The Way - 3:08
5. Trouble With This Town - 2:59
6. Got Me Where I Want You - 3:14
7. Fast As You - 3:15
8. I Am Too - 3:02
9. Good, Bad & Ugly - 3:04
10. Blue Roses - 3:25

Art-Nr.: 9844
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Country
Status: Programm || Typ: CD || Preis: € 14,90

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Sugarland - love on the inside ~ deluxe fan edition [2008]
Deluxe Fan-Edition mit 5 Bonustracks! Erfrischend , lebendig, wunderbar! Sugarland (Jennifer Nettles und Kristian Bush) setzen auch mit ihrem von den Fans heiß herbeigesehnten dritten Album konsequent ihren musikalisch eingeschlagenenWeg fort und werden dabei immer besser! Nettles' Stimme war nie kraftvoller, variabler und stärker, Bush's Harmonies, sein Acoustic Gitarren- und Mandolinenspiel waren nie vielfältiger. Dieses Duo ist mit seinem durchaus in Traditionen verwurzelten, aber so modernen, knackigen, dabei alles andere als glamourösen, sondern stets erdigen, exakt auf den Punkt produzierten New Contry-/Country-Rockpop-Sound eine wahre Wohltat für Nashville! Das Album erscheint in den USA in zwei Ausgaben, einer "normalen" Version mit 12 neuen Tracks und einer sogenannten "Deluxe Fan-Edition" mit 5 zusätzlichen Bonustracks! Darüber hinaus kommt die Deluxe-Ausgabe in einer speziellen, edlen Digipack-Verpackung inklusive eines alle Texte und viele Fotos enthaltenden, 20-seitigen Booklets und der Zugangsmöglichkeit zu exklusivem Video-Material. Also, keine Frage: Die "aufgemotzte" Ausgabe ist definitiv die, die es sich lohnt zu kaufen - und deshalb bieten wir auch ausschließlich diese an! Insgesamt ist das Songmaterial im Vergleich zu den beiden mega-erfolgreichen Vorgängern vielleicht etwas "verhaltener" ausgefallen. Will heißen: Der Anteil an Balladen hat im Vergleich zu den Uptempo-Nummern leicht zugenommen. Dennoch strotzt auch dieses Album vor Dynamik und Energie - und das Songmaterial ist einfach nur klasse! Ohne Ausnahme! Toll beispielsweise der froh gelaunte Opener "All I want to do" (gleichzeitig die erste Single und bereits auf dem besten Wege die nächste Nr. 1 des Duos zu werden), mit seinen kernigen Slide Gitarren-Licks (großartig: Gitarren-As Michael Landau), dem trockenen Ambiente und dem wundervollen "Ooh hu hu hu hu"-Mitsing-Refrain, der knackige, sehr melodische Uptempo Rockin' Country-Shuffle/-Boogie "It happens", der traumhafte, einfach herrlich ins Ohr gehende Country-Stomper "We run" mit seinen vitalen Acoustic Gitarren-Rhythmen, dem knackigen Drumming und großartigen Akkordeon-Spiel, die exzellente, leicht folkig angehauchte, einmal mehr wundervoll melodische, Mandolinen-getränkte Country-Ballde "Genevieve", das entspannte "Already gone", der satte, rockige, ungemein melodische Knaller "Take me as I am", das rootsige, viel Americana-Feeling aufbauende, von schöner Slide, Steelguitar und einem klasse Traditional Country-Rhythmus bestimmte "Steve Earle" (einer Huldigung der beiden an die große Roots-/Alternate Country-Ikone), und die wunderschöne, getragene, ruhige, kristallklar in Szene gesetzte, reine Country-Ballade "Very last country song" - eine traumhafte Nummer! Die fünf, auf der Fan-Edition zusätzlich enthaltenen Songs (3 weitere neue Studio-Tracks und 2 bärenstarke, bislang auch nicht als Studioversion existierende Live-Nummern) reihen sich nahtlos an den hohen Qualitätsstandard der übrigen Stücke an und sind somit für den geneigten Sugarland- und New Country-Fan ebenso unverzichtbar! Erwähnenswert hier besonders die brillante Live-Fassung des Achtziger Jahre-/Dream Academy-Klassikers "Life in a northern town", das am 13. Dezember 2007 in Fayettevill/North Carolina während der gemeinsamen US-Tour von Sugarland mit Little Big Town und Jake Owen mitgeschnitten wurde, die sich auch alle gesanglich an dieser tollen Intepretation beteiligten. Sugarland sind und bleiben mit "Love on the inside" (vielleicht sogar ihr ausgereiftestes, bestes Album) eines der absoluten Zugpferde Nashvilles in Sachen knackigem, modernem, qualitativ gochwertigem New Country, inklusive "eingebauter" Hit- und Chart-Garantie! Ein tolles Album - und darüber hinaus mit über 71 Minuten Spielzeit ein wirklich prall gefüll

Ganz interessant: Ein offizieller Sugaland "Song by Song"-Überblick (im Original):

"All I Want To Do"
The duo’s intent here was to have a lot of swing to the lead single of this album. To funk it up a bit, and keep it very hooky. Musically, this number’s somewhere between Bonnie Raitt and Jack Johnson, with some Marvin Gaye and Van Halen thrown in. "I love the flirty sound," says Jennifer Nettles. "We just always want to bring different energies, and we got to play on the lighter side this time." If you listen close, the easy percussion from Matt Chamberlain gives the song its sexy heartbeat.

"It Happens"
Sometimes, you just gotta let go. That’s what this gritty little tune’s all about, says the duo. "We always say we should take the music seriously, but not ourselves," Nettles says. When the guitar comes in at the top, you know this is going to be a little more 80s pop than down-home country. Think "Walking on Sunshine". Because this tune wraps it all up with some very advisable lyrics: "Let go, laughing". And Nettles thinks the ironies, like getting in a fender bender with your ex and his new girl, shows listeners what a grand sense of humor the universe has. It’s a very uptempo way to look at a world that’s out of your control.

"We Run"
New love. Young love. Green love. There’s an excitement to that experience that Sugarland has captured in this intoxicating bluegrassy rocker. Nettles admits this grew from a seed of an idea that Bush had, since he grew up playing mountain music in Tennessee. And this song lends itself to that Appalachian sound, that driving four-on-the-floor beat. You can’t really describe that feeling, so the duo chose to show it rather than tell it. The imagery--of pockets of dirt and reckless weather on the breath--convey how beautiful, messy and powerful love can be.

"Joey"
Teenage love doesn’t always have a happy ending. Especially when a tear-jerker like Bill Anderson has pen in hand. He helped Nettles and Bush craft this modern take on the traditional teen tragedy, and yet much more alternative influences went into the vocals. "We ended up with a haunting wail in the chorus and this R.E.M. background vocal," says Bush of the melancholy music. "It’s simple and dark." The rich texture of this song is built around all those "what ifs" that run through your mind as you explore regret. "Nothing mitigates loss," says Nettles "But everyone has regrets, so we can all relate."

"Love"
Nettles’ powerhouse pipes take center stage in this ballad. And that strength comes though in the form of questions, about how you can possibly define love. Is it the face of a child? Kindness in the eyes of a stranger? In a hotel room in Washington D.C., when Sugarland was chasing down the theme of the whole album, the topic of love came up. "No way could you ever narrow it down," Nettles says of their writing time with Tim Owens ("Settlin’"). There’s love lost, love found, new and old loves. So this tune gets right in the middle, and makes some reaches musically. Bush’s powerful voice is featured for the second half of this song. "When we were writing the back half, Jen said ‘I want you to sing these words I wrote just for you,’" recalls Bush. "I will always feel special singing those words."

"Genevieve"
Nettles said that Bush had the whole first verse worked out. That verse--and his pure, sweet mandolin work--were inspiring enough. But when the idea for some three-part harmony came up, it only made this dirge of a country heartache even better. Nettles says it reminded her of some of the southern Baptist hymns she grew up on, and likes that the story’s not clear cut. "It’s a beautiful thing when we get to play characters that are complicated." There’s a mystery of who this character is that is coping with such a dramatic loss. It’s a little twisted. But that creates an even stronger pull into the lyrics.

"Already Gone"
A waltz-time lope? On a country album? Writing with Bobby Pinson ("Want To"), the duo was determined to do a song in six-eight. And to keep it very personal. "This is the story of coming of age, literally and emotionally," says Nettles. And it’s such a healing tale, about a woman who is growing up, leaving home, falling in love and saying goodbye.

"Keep You"
Is it possible to write an emotional song about being numb? It’s like writing a song about being loud by being quiet, Nettles and Bush think. That irony, blended with a bittersweet epiphany of knowing it’s time to walk away, make this one of the most contemporary done-me-wrong songs of our time. "Subtlety and nuance make all the difference in this song. Painting emotions with broad strokes is easy, but this time we’re using a toothbrush to dig through the finer emotions," says Nettles, comparing the duo to archeologists. And the vocal range she plays with throughout keep this song on the edgier side, because of the way she explodes into huge notes that few singers can even attempt.

"Take Me As I Am"
When the curtain opens, there’s a woman in a hotel room at night. As the song unravels, so does the mystery of why she’s there. In this character-driven narrative, with a Pat Benatar influence and some solid electric guitar work, the empowering message is clear. When you reach that point, when you are comfortable in your own skin, the line about "I’m not perfect, but I’m worth it" makes all the sense in the world. This could very well be the anthem of the unsung heroes who walk among us every day. "This is a very grown-up place to get to in your life," Nettles explains.

"What I’d Give"
Written with Kenny Chesney’s long-time lead guitarist Clayton Mitchell, this one builds a lingering story around some Faces era guitar and mandolin stylings. The kind that Sugarland thinks make for a story of their own. Usually in country, the song ends when the bow is tied off neatly with a lyric. But after the last lyric ends, they still had more to say musically. Nettles vocals are sultrier than they’ve ever been, and she likes the romantic implications of the lyrics. And both she and Bush agree that if you aren’t making out halfway into this six-minute yearning, then you aren’t ever going to be.

"Steve Earle"
If you know anything about Steve Earle, this song will thrill you with its comic pining for his songwriting. If you don’t know him, it’ll certainly pique your curiosity. Both Nettles and Bush share a fondness for Earle’s brand of country. It taught them that country was still viable, and gave them confidence to reimagine the sound. And when the duo found out what a shameless romantic Earle was, they had to set all his comings and goings to music. This upbeat barn burner fueled by a big pedal steel, is a playful way to process a painful subject. Nettles looks at it this way: "There comes a point in life of a troubadour when the character can become heroic. Even legendary."

"Very Last Country Song"
Aptly named, the last song on the album is a look at what would happen if nothing ever went wrong again. "If life stayed the way it was, if those conditions weren’t in our lives, then this would literally be the last country song," says Nettles. Everything is as it should be was the impetus and inspiration behind this song. Co-writer Tim Owens told the duo that someone had once asked him why country music was always so sad. Owens’ answer was that if bad things never happened, then what would we have to write about? The ethereal tones underneath this song stay quiet enough so the insight into the human condition can be felt. Like when you can hear Nettles smile as she sings the verse that looks back on the unexpected joy of an unexpected child.

Plus 5 Bonus-Tacks:

Fall Into Me 4:46
Operation: Working Vacation 3:59
Wishing 4:11
Life In A Northern Town (Live) 4:14
Come On Get Higher (Live)

Art-Nr.: 5848
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Country
Status: Programm || Typ: CD || Preis: € 18,90

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