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Blues Traveler - hurry up & hang around [2018]
Sie sind noch immer, bzw. wieder, in einer fantastischen Verfassung. Die großartigen Root-/Jamrock-Veteranen um Mastermind und Harp-Wizard John Popper präsentieren mit ihrem neuen, nunmehr 13. Studioalbum, ein absolutes Prachtteil ab, das die große Blues Traveler-Fanbase vollstens überzeugen wird. Tolles Songmaterial, große Spielfreude, hervorragend hängen bleibendes Material, Abwechslungsreichtum - einfach stark!

Hier noch ein Original U.S.-Review:

Blues Traveler has always been a band that lets their sound, travel, if you will. Along the winding path of their career, the one constant has been change. "Save His Soul" sounded nothing like "Four", which sounded nothing like "Truth Be Told", which sounded nothing like "Blow Up The Moon". They have always been chasing something, but what exactly that is has always been nebulous. In the beginning, the strove for respect. Then they strove for the status they deserved. Then they strove to regain their place. And finally, they strove to make themselves happy. That leaves us with a string of records that hold together, but form a patchwork that draws your attention to a different area each time. And even when they are taking a detour that might not be your choice, there are always interesting twists that make it worth your while to take the ride with them.
With the band having reached a milestone of longevity, the question of how to commemorate that brings them back (nearly) full circle. While their last couple records have seen Blues Traveler injecting their sound with pop songwriters in the search for the perfect collaboration, "Hurry Up & Hang Around" finds them stripping back to the garage band they started out as. This is the most classically Blues Traveler album they have made, in approach, in many a year.
Our first taste of this chapter came from the opening track, "Accelerated Nation", which came out of the gates in traditional Blues Traveler form. Sounding like a mix of all their eras, the song fused their classic sound with the polished writing of their modern work, giving us a song that fits the same mold "Most Precarious" did (and sadly never got credit for - that was a better single than it is remembered as).
Longtime fans will recognize bits and pieces that should evoke a smile, like how John Popper's melody in the verses of "She Becomes My Way" stretches a syllable or two longer than anyone else would write it. Those are the details that I have always appreciated, both as a fan and as a songwriter. Every writer and every band has idiosyncrasies that pop up, which I think got too smoothed out with the amount of collaboration they had been doing lately. Even when they were writing great songs, like "Matador" was, they didn't have those trademark elements. Hearing them again is a treat.
Another one pops up on "Daddy Went A Giggin'", where Popper's melody in the verses, and some of the feel of the instrumental, is somewhat pulled from his solo album, "Zygote" (the song "His Own Hands" in particular). The songwriting on this record is a throwback to the "Four" and "Straight On Til Morning" period, but more concise than they were back then. The band has been constantly trimming away the excess from their old tendencies, which leaves us with a lean record. Old fans might think there's a looseness missing from the recordings, but it shows how their focus has shifted over the years towards sharp songwriting.
The thing about being a Blues Traveler fan is that we can argue over which of their experiments are our favorites. Some of us will love how gritty and heavy they got on "Bastardos!", while others will appreciate the slickness of "Truth Be Told". This one, though, feels like the right record for an anniversary period, because it is the one record since "Four" that best captures every side of the band.
Given how much the world has changed since "Run Around" and "Hook" were near the top of the charts, it's a good decision that the band is no longer trying to chase a hit, and is instead writing music that is befitting of their status. There are clover hooks and strong melodies, but they integrate into the core of the band's sound, rather than sounding like the token attempt to appeal to a demographic that no longer exists. Look, I love "Girl Inside My Head" and "Amber Awaits" too, but even then there no longer existed the proper outlet for them to become mainstream hits.
"Hurry Up & Hang Around" is a record made for Blues Traveler fans by the biggest fans of them all, the band. At this stage of their career, that's exactly what most people want to hear. And listening to the results, I can't argue. This record will make any Blues Traveler fan happy, and it will reset things so the next experiment is more welcome. (Bloody Good Music / Chris C)

Das komplette Tracklisting:

1. Accelerated Nation - 3:04
2. She Becomes My Way - 3:51
3. The Touch She Has - 4:22
4. When You Fall Down - 3:32
5. The Wolf Is Bumpin - 3:48
6. Daddy Went a Giggin - 3:43
7. Tangle Of Our Dreaming - 3:36
8. More Than Truth - 3:02
9. Prayer Upon The Wind - 2:20
10. Miss Olympus - 4:02
11. Phone Call From Leavenworth - 4:35
12. Ode From The Aspect - 4:55

Art-Nr.: 9717
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Rock
Status: Programm || Typ: CD || Preis: € 15,90

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Brooks, Kix - new to this town [2012]
Brooks & Dunn sind Geschichte, doch nach Ronnie Dunn kommt nun auch die andere Häfte des erfolgreichsten Country-Duos aller Zeiten mit einem Solo-Album! "New to this town" heisst das hervorragend gelungene Werk, mit dem Kix Brooks eindrucksvoll offenbart, was er auch ohne seinen kongenialen Partner in der Lage zu leisten ist. 12 starke Nummern, zumeist sehr kraftvoll und knackig in Szene gesetzt (der Balladen-Anteil ist klar in der Minderzahl), zwischen traditionellen Anlagen und sehr abwechslungsreichem, zuweilen durchaus rockigem New Country. Gast, Slide-Gitarrist und Duett-Partner beim Titelstück ust übrigens Joe Walsh (The Eagles). Die Musik passt durchaus zur Philosophie, die auch Brooks & Dunn verkörperten, hat aber auch ihren eigenen Pep. Die Melodien sind prima! Gratulation an Kix Brooks zu diesem großartigen Album!

Wen es interessiert: Hier im Original eine sehr ausführliche, aktuelle Biographie mit der Geschichte zum neuen Album im Original-Wortlaut:

"Wish I was new to this town
Just pullin’ in checking it out for the first time”
— “New to This Town” by Kix Brooks, Marv Green and Terry McBride

It’s been more than 30 years since Kix Brooks was new to the town that he made his home, where he married, raised two children and built an accomplished career as a songwriter, singer and half of the most successful duo in country music history, a weekly national radio show host, magazine columnist, film producer, actor, winery owner and active and influential member of the music industry and community at large.

And yet here he is, picking up where he started when he really was new to this town, when his very first solo single in 1983 lumbered up the country chart to #73 before being hijacked by gravity into oblivion.

“New to This Town” is the title cut from the album that he hopes will reintroduce him to music fans, not exactly as a brand new man—to borrow a phrase from a song he co-wrote many moons ago—but as his own man, with his own songs to sing and his own unique story to tell.
Though the song is about a romantic relationship, metaphorically it suggests another interpretation. “When you’re starting out, there’s so much fear that if you screw up or put out the wrong record, you’ve lost that chance to live your dream. At this point in my career, there’s a different kind of uncertainty and risk that the people who have seen me perform for 20 years as half of Brooks & Dunn won’t be able to see me as anything but that. So in that sense, being new to town would be good to be able to do again.”

Kix Brooks’ career as a musician began long before he came to Nashville, which is less than 100 miles from where the Louisiana native was shipped off for high school at Tennessee’s Sewanee Military Academy. “I wasn’t bad, but I wasn’t good,” he confesses with a smile. “The discipline was good for me. It gave me structure and problem-solving skills, which are really helpful for creative people.”

Brooks grew up in a musical family, had his first guitar before he hit his teens, and while in Sewanee, he began playing coffee houses with his roommate, Nashville native Jody Williams. “Jody turned me on to the Opry,” expanding the range of country music that Brooks already loved. “I was a fan of bluegrass, rock and outlaw country, people like Willie, Cash and Roger Miller. I loved the Allman Brothers, Leon Russell, the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Asleep at the Wheel, Guy Clark, Jerry Jeff Walker. ”
After graduation, he went to Louisiana Tech, gaining a foundational education in reading music and the theory of composition while getting hands-on experience playing clubs around town. Realizing that he wasn’t cut out to be in the marching band, school choir, or orchestra—which were required for a music degree—he switched his major to speech and got into theater, both of which would later serve him well.

A brief sabbatical from school led him to Alaska in 1976, working for his dad, a pipeline contractor. The job was great seed money, he recalls, “So when I got home, I bought a new car, a new guitar, a bottle of whiskey, and I was ready to get back at it.

“I had a band and I did some solo stuff. I could bang on a guitar and open up for just about anybody playing clubs in Shreveport. My plan was to be somebody.”
But an invitation from his sister put “Plan A” on hold. “She called me out of the blue and asked if I would come to Maine and help her with a television production company. So I was doing radio and television production, commercials, and it was a great experience. But I was also playing clubs and was still drawn to that. I enjoyed advertising, I enjoyed Maine. But in my heart of hearts, I just wanted to play music.”

So he took off again for Louisiana but stopped in Nashville to visit with his old roommate Jody Williams. “We stayed up all night talking and playing music, and Jody tried to talk me into staying. He said I could make a living writing songs. I said, ‘A, you’re nuts, and B, I’m going to New Orleans to play music.’”
But as fun as it was, the pace—and the partying—began to take a toll. “I called Jody up and said, ‘Do you really think I could make a living writing songs?’ and he said, ‘Get your ass up here!’”

True to his word, Williams gave Brooks a place to crash and found him a job with a concert production company while arranging meetings for him with music publishers around town.

“Everybody was really nice for about half a song, and then I wrote some more songs and called them back, and everyone was always out to lunch. So I started breaking songs down and figuring out what these guys were doing, which doesn’t mean you can do it, but at least I did my homework and really started working harder at trying to figure out how to do it. I realized it was one thing to make people smile in bars and another thing to make a living as a songwriter in Nashville.”
His hard work paid off, and less than two years after pulling into town, Brooks had a publishing deal and a #1 cut. Some things didn’t pan out, like his first album in 1983 on a label that went defunct before the album was released and a 1989 album on Capitol that went nowhere fast.
But he was making a living—a good living—writing songs for Tree Publishing, where exec Paul Worley took some of his demos to veteran music man Tim DuBois, head of the Arista Nashville record label. DuBois suggested that Brooks write with the winner of a talent competition, a tall, big-voiced Texan named Ronnie Dunn. When DuBois heard their song demos, the rest became Brooks & Dunn history.

In their 20-year ride, the duo recorded 10 studio albums, released 50 singles, scored 23 #1 hits, sold more than 30 million albums, sold out tours from coast to coast and became one of the most awarded acts in country music history.

But in August of 2009, they revealed what had long been a topic between the partners themselves: that after a final tour and a final compilation album, Brooks & Dunn would be no more.

“It was always an arranged marriage that happened to work out really well and produce some great kids. But after 20 amazing, dream-like years, it was time.”
As for the notion of recording a solo album, Brooks took his time—or as much time as realistic for someone who owns a thriving winery, hosts a weekly syndicated radio show, forms a film production company, takes on roles in three movies and writes all but one of the songs for the soundtrack for the western To Kill a Memory, as well as co-writing the soundtrack for a Christmas movie.

“I have a lot of interests, and I wasn’t at that point thinking of what I would do next. I was kind of looking forward to chilling for a year or so. I wanted to take my time. I started writing during the last B&D tour, and when we got done, I kept writing while we were making movies.”
When the time felt right, Brooks approached his album with customary enthusiasm, producing and recording nearly 50 songs before beginning the challenging process of narrowing the field. “There were a few like [the Brooks/Leslie Satcher co-write] ‘Moonshine Road’ that I was sort of building the album around,” he says, “so you try to take the ones that fit the other songs the best, that fit you best, or where the track is just smoking.”

The result is a record that is emphatically and uniquely Kix Brooks—rocking, smoky, swampy and bluesy, with belts of bayou and hits of Cajun zydeco. Nine of the album’s dozen tracks bear Brooks’ name as a co-writer, collaborating with such longtime friends and writing luminaries as Bob DiPiero and David Lee Murphy (on the lyrically clever “Closin’ Time at Home”), Rhett Akins and Dallas Davidson (for the mid-tempo musical celebration of “Bring It on Home”), and Marv Green and Terry McBride on “New to This Town,” the title track single that almost didn’t make the album.

“We were kind of done with everything, I had recorded the album, and Jay DeMarcus and I were doing the soundtrack for a Christmas movie over at his house. But I was thinking about that song, so he was nice enough to help me produce it and let me use the pickers while we were working there. He really liked the song, so I said, ‘Let’s do it together.’”

Later, “The engineer from my radio show said, ‘You ought to get some Joe Walsh-sounding slide on that.’ I’m like, ‘Hmm, what if I could get Joe Walsh?’ My manager is partners with Irving Azoff, who sent it to Joe, and he called me up and put the slide on there for me. So that worked out great.”
In a new-to-this-town, full-circle touch, the album also features two songs that Brooks wrote with Rafe Van Hoy. With Deborah Allen, they penned Brooks’ first #1 as a songwriter (John Conlee’s ’83 chart-topper, “I’m Only in It for the Love”), and they pair here on the backsliding fun of “Complete 360” and team with Curly Putman on the groove-and-soul-filled, after-hours portrait of “my baby’s” “Tattoo.”

Now, with his album complete, Brooks is just looking forward to getting it into the hands of fans and resuming the solo career that began long ago when his entire plan “was to be somebody.”

“That fear I had at one point in my career where you’re scared to death to make the wrong move, I don’t feel that way now. But you still really want to do something that is relevant and makes people rock, and look out at a crowd and know you have connected, you’ve hit that nerve. I don’t think you ever get over that.”

(This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.)

Das komplette Tracklisting:

1. New to this Town - 4:20
2. Moonshine Road - 4:21
3. Bring It On Home - 3:44
4. There's the Sun - 3:05
5. Complete 360 - 3:16
6. My Baby - 2:55
7. Tattoo - 3:25
8. In the Right Place - 3:47
9. Next to That Woman - 3:21
10. Let's Do This Thing - 2:57
11. Closin' Time at Home - 3:37
12. She Knew I Was a Cowboy - 3:22

Art-Nr.: 7907
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Country
Status: Programm || Typ: CD || Preis: € 13,90

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Civil Wars, The - same [2013]
Sehnlichst erwartetes Follow-Up des grandiosen Americana-/Singer-Songwriter-/Alternative Country-/Folk Rock-Duos Joy Williams und John Paul White zu dem mit 3 Grammys dekorierten, frenetisch gefeierten Debut "Barton hollow". The Civil Wars machen genau da weiter, wo sie mit ihrem Vorgänger aufgehört haben. Songmaterial und Performance sind exzellent!

Kurze Original-Produktinfo:
The Civil Wars' highly anticipated sophomore self-titled album is the follow up to the three-time Grammy Award-winning duo's acclaimed debut, Barton Hollow.
The Civil Wars was recorded in Nashville between August 2012 and January 2013. Charlie Peacock was once again at the helm as producer for the album. Additionally, Rick Rubin produced the duo's performance for the track "I Had Me a Girl" in August of 2011. Peacock later completed the track by producing the instrumentation and mix.

Exklusives "Track by Track"-Review zu allen Stücken des Albums von Joy Williams:

THE ONE THAT GOT AWAY

This song pays homage to regret. Nearly everybody I've come across has somebody in their life that they wonder what life would be like if they'd never met that person. It's that sliding-door moment -- in the blink of an eye everything could change. Either for the positive or the negative.
John Paul and I wrote this song in the screened-in porch of my and Nate's new home. I remember warm breezes blowing, a mild day. I had recently had my son, Miles, who happened to be asleep with Nate in the living room, right next to the porch. I remember asking John Paul to play quietly so he didn't wake up the baby.

I HAD ME A GIRL

This song always conjures up an image of a glass of whiskey and a lit cigarette. It's a little brooding. A little dangerous. It smolders. It has swagger and grit. It's full of innuendo and Southern Gothic tones. I love the feel of this track, and the way this song came together on the record. "I Had Me a Girl" is one of those musical moments that makes me wish I knew how to play electric guitar. Or any guitar, for that matter.

SAME OLD SAME OLD

This song, to me, represents the ache of monogamy. This isn't an "I'm leaving you" song. It's a vulnerable confession of "I don't want to leave. I want to work on this -- with you." Having said that, someone once told me a story about long-term relationships: to think of them as a continent to explore. I could spend a lifetime backpacking through Africa, and I would still never know all there is to know about that continent. To stay the course, to stay intentional, to stay curious and connected -- that's the heart of it. But it's so easy to lose track of the trail, to get tired, to want to give up, or to want a new adventure. It can be so easy to lose sight of the goodness and mystery within the person sitting right in front of you. That continent idea inspires me, and makes the ache when it comes hurt a little less. To know that it happens to all of us. What I'm realizing now is that sometimes the "same old same old" can actually be rich, worthwhile and a great adventure.

DUST TO DUST

This song is an anthem for the lonely. Sometimes you come across somebody who thinks they are hiding their pain, but if we are all honest, nobody is very good at it. "You're like a mirror, reflecting me. Takes one to know one, so take it from me.” When John Paul and I wrote this late one night in Birmingham, England, we decided to change the pronoun at the end of the song. We wanted to represent that we all experience loneliness in our lives.

EAVESDROP

We brought in our producer, Charlie Peacock, on this song. He helped with arrangements and really helped take the song to a totally different place. Sometimes as an artist, you can't see what needs re-arranging when you're so "in it." Charlie brought perspective. Almost like an eavesdrop within an "Eavesdrop."
Strangely enough, this song always reminds me that my voice has changed since the last album. I have my son to thank for that, truly. When I was first pregnant and performing on the road, I thought something was wrong with my voice. I was having a hard time hitting high notes, while my low notes kept getting deeper and deeper. I did some research with the help of a vocal coach, and learned that hormone levels affect a female singing range. Having a boy, naturally, upped my testosterone levels, making low notes easier to hit and higher notes harder to reach. But the great thing? After having Miles, I regained my high range AND have kept my low range. Pregnancy literally changed the makeup of my vocal cords. There's a different timbre to it now, and I love that I can hear the story of my son in my singing.

DEVIL'S BACKBONE

This song is our take on an Americana murder ballad. It's dark, prickly, anxious. It was fun writing because we just imagined some dust-bowl scenario, a broke-down town, and a man awaiting being hung for something he did in the name of trying to provide for his family. The woman who loves him is watching him standing there on the gallows.
This song always reminds me of when the melody first came to mind. I was doing my makeup in the tiled bathroom upstairs, with my newborn Miles in a yellow rocking bassinet next to me. I started singing, and turned on the voice memo app on my iPhone so I wouldn't forget it. As I sang, Miles started cooing along with me. Not on pitch, mind you, but I'd move a note, and he'd move a note. I'm never deleting that voice memo. It's become one of my favorites.

FROM THIS VALLEY

That's our Grand Ole Opry song. A new spiritual. It's actually the oldest song written on the album. We wrote it before Barton Hollow came out. Even though we didn't have our own recording of it, we started performing it live and it became a fan favorite. It made sense to finally put it on an album. One of my favorite moments on stage every night was singing the a cappella part together.

TELL MAMA

We recorded the performance at Fame studio in Muscle Shoals, a place we'd written a few songs before that made it onto Barton Hollow. I always felt the musical ghosts in that studio, one of whom was the great Etta James. We're a band that's known for covering songs live in our own way, and we thought it would be fun to take a stab at "Tell Mama." I found out later that where we recorded was the same room she recorded her version. That might explain why I kept getting goosebumps.

OH HENRY

We wrote it one week before Barton Hollow, in the mountains of Salt Lake City during our first Sundance Festival. We conjured up a story about a woman who was married to a philandering man. She is begging her man to level with her, and letting him know she can only take so much, a la "it's gonna kill me or it's gonna kill you."

DISARM

Again, we're the band who loves to do covers. Both John Paul and I have always been huge Smashing Pumpkins fans. Nate mentioned it might be a cool cover, and we actually wound up working it out the same day that we wrote "Oh Henry" up in Salt Lake City for Sundance. It turned into another on-stage staple that people asked for every night. We found out later from his then-manager that Billy dug it.

SACRED HEART

We wrote this song in a flat in Paris, with the Eiffel Tower in full view on a cold night. Tall windows, Victorian furniture, and somehow the atmosphere of all of that seeped into the song. Nate and our friends were there in the room as we wrote, all of us drinking wine together. I also loved getting to try out my flawed French. I wrote what words I knew in French, and then had a Parisian friend named Renata Pepper (yes, that's her real name) look it over later and help me translate. When we recorded the song for the album, I called in a French professor from Vanderbilt named Becky Peterson, who has now become a good friend.

D'ARLINE

We wrote this song in the studio behind my house in Nashville, on a warm summer day, with the windows and doors open. This song is a sweet lament, of loss and the belief that you'll never be able to love anybody else again. I stumbled across "Letters of Note" on Twitter, and was struck by the title of a letter written by a famous physicist named Richard Feynman: "I love my wife. My wife is dead." A little over a year after her death, he wrote his wife a love letter and sealed it. It was written in 1946, and wasn't opened until after his death in 1988. He ended his note to his long-lost wife with "Please excuse my not mailing this -- but I don't know your new address."
Another aside to this song: While we were recording the song together, John Paul and I could hear crows cawing in the background that I've since named Edgar, Allen and Poe. This recording and performance of the song is the first and only in existence, a work tape recorded simply on my iPhone.

Das komplette Tracklisting:

1. The One That Got Away - 3.32
2. I Had Me a Girl - 3.45
3. Same Old Same Old - 3.48
4. Dust to Dust - 3.49
5. Eavesdrop - 3.35
6. Devil's Backbone - 2.29
7. From This Valley - 3.33
8. Tell Mama - 3.48
9. Oh Henry - 3.32
10. Disarm - 4.42
11. Sacred Heart - 3.19
12. D'Arline - 3.06

Art-Nr.: 8264
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Rock; Country
Status: Programm || Typ: CD || Preis: € 13,90

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McEntire, Reba - keep on loving you [2009]
Reba's neue... - und es ist wieder ein prima Album geworden. Reba McEntire ist eine großartige Künstlerin, die es problemlos versteht, sich den Gegebenheiten des modernen Nashville's anzupassen, ohne auch nur im geringsten ihre Wurzeln zu leugnen. Genau das ist ihr hier bestens gelungen. So ist "Keep on loving you" ein modernes, überwiegend schön knackiges, kraftvolles Country-/New Country-/Contemporary Country-Album geworden, das typisch Reba ist, und eindrucksvoll offenbart, dass die Diva in Nashville's Gegenwart angekommen ist. Klasse!

Reba hat zu jedem einzelnen Stück des neuen Albums ein paar Gedanken und Statements preis gegeben, die wir nachstehend im Originaltext weitergeben:

1. "Strange" (Wendell Mobley, Jason Sellers, Neil Thrasher)
"I liked the way it has a lot of different melodies to it. It has great range, but the main reason I like it is because it's so sassy. I love the attitude of it. It's totally different, but it reminds me of the attitudes of `Can't Even Get the Blues.' I seem to have success with sassy attitude songs. This song is about a woman who has been left behind from her partner or boyfriend, and she is trying to feel sad, but it's just not working, so she's going on with her life. It's a strong woman song."

2. "Just When I Thought I'd Stopped Loving You" (Mark Nesler, Rivers Rutherford)
"This is the song that Rivers Rutherford wrote with Mark Nesler. I loved the beat and the melody. It reminded me of a Rascal Flatts song in the first part of it. It's really catchy. It's a song that I'd be singing the middle of the night when I woke up, so I knew it would be a great song when it is in your subconscious like that. I would say this is the least powerful woman song, because she is like, `Oh, I can't give in and take you back one more time, I can't,' but then she does. I hate to say it's a booty call song, but it does remind me of that. I guess this is my booty call song!"

3. "I Keep On Lovin' You" (Ronnie Dunn, Terry McBride)
"We were in the studio recording with Tony Brown, and Tony had said they were just finishing up some of the Brooks & Dunn songs. He said, `You ought to listen to this one song. I just love the song. I think it is wonderful. I think it can relate to a couple who have been together for a short time or a long time, but basically a long time. We've been through the highs and lows and ups and downs, we've fought and gotten back together, but no matter what we go through, I'm going to keep on loving you. I think it's an anniversary song."

4. "I Want a Cowboy" (Katrina Elam, Wayne Kirkpatrick, Jimmie Lee Sloas)
"Katrina Elam co-wrote this song. I am a huge fan of Katrina Elam. She is one of the best singers I've ever heard. I asked Tony to ask Katrina if I could cut `I Want a Cowboy.' She came in and sang some of the harmony on it too. It's a great kick-ass song that is good attitude. And I'm a cowgirl; I've rodeoed 10 years and I'm a third-generation rodeo brat, so I thought it was just perfect."

5. "Consider Me Gone" (Steve Diamond, Marv Green)
"It's a strong woman song. I'm sure there are tons of women who get the cold shoulder when the husband comes in from work. He's had a rough day and she's had three kids at home, especially if it's summer. He doesn't want to talk, something's going on and it's confrontation time. If you are giving me the cold shoulder, if you're not wanting to talk to me, and if things aren't getting any better and if I don't turn you on, consider me gone. Here's the way the cow eats the cabbage. It's like, let's poop or get off the pot. Tell it like it is. It's a pretty cool song and it's confrontation time. That is one thing that is wrong with relationships, that there's not enough communication."

6. "But Why" (Jason Sellers, Neil Thrasher)
"I love the melody. It's one of those love songs that I usually don't record. It's also a strong woman song: `I can do this by myself, but why would I want to when I can share it with you?' It's a real sweet love song. It's a very soft song."

7. "Pink Guitar" (Ed Hill, Jamie O'Neal, Shaye Smith)
"This is just a kick-ass fun song. I can see lots of little girls going, `Yeah, I want to play guitar.' When I was growing up, guitars were for boys; that was the men's instrument, especially an electric guitar. Girls could play an acoustic guitar. I remember the girl who played on one of the awards shows with Carrie Underwood. She got out there and played her butt off. That was when I found `Pink Guitar.' I said, `She's going to love this song.' I love the attitude of it. It's still country; it's almost like `Fancy.' This girl had this dream and she went on to survive and succeed. It's real cute and I love to sing it."

8. "She's Turning 50 Today" (Liz Hengber, Tommy Lee James, Reba McEntire)
"It's a song about a woman who found out that her husband left on Saturday for a woman who is half her age. She spent the day lying in bed, but then on Monday got up, loaded up her pickup truck and began a new chapter of her life. She went on with her life and didn't look back. I wrote the first two lines of `She's Turning 50 Today' and sent it to Liz Hengber. I said, `Why don't you work on this a little bit and email me back what you've got?' Two years went by, and I said, `Liz, what about that song?' She said, `Tommy Lee James and I are going to work on it. So by the time this album came around to start recording, they sent me an MP3 of it while I was in the studio. I rewrote the second verse to make it more personal and relate to me when I left Stringtown, Oklahoma, in 1987. So in a way it's about me leaving a relationship, but it was certainly years ago, but put the two together."

9. "Eight Crazy Hours (In the Story of Love)" (Leslie Satcher, Darrell Scott) "This is a song I was on the fence about because it was so deep that I just didn't know how to take it. And so I let Autumn McEntire Sizemore, my niece, listen to it. She started crying and said, `You've got to record this song.' I let more people listen to it and they were like, `Oh my gosh!' It didn't hit me as hard as it did a lot of other people. I guess I haven't had to get away. I think my music is my release. Whenever I am menopausal or whatever, I can release things in my music when I sing. That is my therapy. It touched so many people that I recorded it. When I sang it live it choked me up so much that I couldn't get through it. This woman has a meltdown and she is just putting sheets on the bed and winds up in a bunch of dirty clothes on the floor, crying her eyes out. She checks into a cheap motel and lets it all out, crying in the bathtub. It was just as simple as picking up the kids and she's back in life again. She just needed to go away and take time for herself. Eight hours later, they're sitting around table eating chicken and laughing. It's eight crazy hours and the story of love."

10. "Nothing To Lose" (Kim Fox)
"Nothing to Lose" was on Melonie Cannon's album. When I was working with (Melonie's father) Buddy Cannon years ago, he gave it to me. I love Melonie's voice. `Nothing to Lose' was one of those songs that I said, `Man, if I could ever record that...,' so I did. I told everybody, `I want to feature the band on this,' so we let the band play two or three times. Everybody had an instrumental. It's about a woman leaving on the bus going down to Georgia. She doesn't know where she's going and doesn't know what lies ahead, but she doesn't care. It's another strong woman song."

11. "Over You" (Michael Dulaney, Steven Dale Jones, Jason Sellers)
"Whew! That is a sad song, kind of like Anne Steele. It's a beautiful melody. (My husband) Narvel said he loved this song. He would play the demo over and over. It's just one of those about `I knew the day would come when we would see each other again. You look great and got on with your life, but I'm still not over you.' It's really sad."

12. "Maggie Creek Road" (Karen Rochelle, James Slater)
"We were in the studio and I was having trouble with my resonance; I wasn't getting my soft voice at all. During lunch I saw Dr. Richard Quisling, my throat doctor in Nashville, and he opened up my sinuses or resonances or something. I came back to the studio and started singing again and Tony Brown's mouth dropped open, `My gosh, what did he do to you?' `He lasered out a little infection.' I put Dr. Quisling on my album thanks-yous. He is just a miracle worker. I had been on the fence about this song, but Tony really wanted me to record it. While I was coming back in, I said, `Let's do `Maggie Creek Road' next,' and he said, `Yes!' It's about this woman who has a daughter that is almost déjà vu for this mother. The little girl is leaving with evidently an older man on a date. This is what happened to the mother 20 years ago. She isn't going to let history repeat itself, so she follows them. They are parked down by the river and she opens the door and takes care of the situation. As the song says, `You don't want to see Mama go to war.' Mama was protecting her daughter. It's one of those swampy Louisiana songs with that feel."

13. "I'll Have What She's Having" (Jimmy Melton, Georgia Middleman)
"This is a cute song. I loved it the first time I heard it. They had horns on it and I said, `Of course we'll change it to fiddle and steel guitar.' It's real sassy. A woman is walking into a bar and she's looking for a man. She sees a woman having a good time, dancing with a man. `I'll have what she's having... and by the way, that looks hot.' We'll have fun with it onstage."

Das komplette Tracklisting:

1 Strange - 3:00   
2 Just When I Thought I'd Stopped Loving You - 3:50   
3 I Keep on Lovin' You - 3:13   
4 I Want a Cowboy - 3:39   
5 Consider Me Gone - 3:38   
6 But Why - 3:28   
7 Pink Guitar - 2:53   
8 She's Turning 50 Today - 4:05   
9 Eight Crazy Hours (In the Story of Love) - 4:04   
10 Nothing to Lose - 4:47   
11 Over You - 3:56   
12 Maggie Creek Road - 4:50   
13 I'll Have What She's Having - 2:59

Art-Nr.: 6516
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Country
Status: Programm || Typ: CD || Preis: € 16,90

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Womack, Lee Ann - there's more where that came from [2005]
Das hätte man Lee Ann Womack, die ja eher als Vertreterin des "Nashville goes Pop"-Modern-Country galt, kaum zugetraut: Ein reines, klassisches Copuntryalbum - und was für eines! Große Leistung! Voller Eleganz bringt uns Lee Ann mit ihrem neuen Album die guten alten Zeiten zurück, als Königinnen der Countrymusic, wie Tammy Wynette, Tanya Tucker, Lynn Anderson oder Dolly Parton die Charts regierten. Den Zauber ihrer neuen Songs machen die wundervoll traditionellen Arrangements aus, deren Sound sich in freundlich wimmernden Steelguitars, feinem Klavier, entspannter Mundharmonika, großartigen Fiddles, und frischen, weichen Gitarren wieder findet, frei von jeglicher Hektik oder gar Aggressivität. Eine genußvolle Lockerheit und Entspannung und umgibt die wunderbaren Lieder! "Some people take voice lessons to learn how to sing, but I just sat and listened to Country Music records like George Jones, Dolly Parton and stuff like that. That's how I learned how to sing", sagt die Tochter eines "East Texas Country Deejays"! Immer und immer wieder hat sie die Platten ihres Vaters gehört, hat sie lieben gelernt und sich nichts sehnlicher gewünscht, so zu klingen wie ihre Heldinnen. Das sind die Roots von Lee Ann Womack! Und sie hat es geschafft! "There's more where that came from" ist unverfälschter, zeitlos schöner Country, gleichzeitig voller Frische und Tradition, mit dem sie sich voller Respekt auf eine Stufe mit den Großen der Countrymusic stellen kann. Hut ab! Es beginnt mit dem entspannten, von toller Fiddle, dezenter Baritone Gitarre und viel Honky Tonk-Esprit ausgestatteten, traditionellen Title-Track, der einem vorkommt, als würde er von einem weiblichen George Strait vorgetragen. Weiter geht es mit dem großartigen "One's a couple", einer geschickt, dezent knackig und sehr vielschichtig in einem transparenten Klangbild aus herrlicher Fiddle, Acoustic Giitarren, wunderbar weichen und zurückhaltend eingesetzten E-Gitarren, klasse Piano, jaulender Steel und recht trocken ausgerichteter Percussion arrangierten, lupenreinen Country-Ballade von zeitloser Schönheit. Eine bärenstarke Nummer! So folgt ein starker Titel dem nächsten! Wie zum Breispiel die hinreißende "cheatin'" Countrynummer "I may hate myself in the morning", das mit Mandoline, Mundharmonika und excellenter Steel- und Baritone-Guitar getränkte, frische "The last time", das schön flotte, regelrecht zum Mitwippen geeignete, flockige "He oughta know that by now", die traumhafte "Pure Country"-Ballade "Happiness" (es ist einfach herrlich, wenn ein Stück schon mit einer Textzeile wie "Down at the lost highway café" beginnt) mit ihrer wunderbaren Melodie, dem klasse Country-Piano, sowie der traurigen Steel und Fiddle, die knackige Midtempo-Nummer "When you get to me" mit ihren schönen Gitarren, oder das rhythmische Banjo-driven "What I miss about heaven"! Ganz große Klasse ist auch das wunderschöne, ruhige Remake von Sonny Throckmorton's "Waiting for the sun to shine", das man ja neben dem Original auch noch von Ricky Skaggs kennt! Nach dem letzten Stück folgt übrigens noch ein nicht in der Tracklist aufgeführter "hidden track" (die CD also einfach weiterlaufen lassen), und zwar eine tolle Coverversion des Porter Wagoner/Dolly Parton-Klassikers "Just someone I used to know"! Es gibt keine Schwachstellen! Lee Ann Womack mit dem wohl besten Alnum ihrer bisherigen Karriere - anspruchsvoll, gefällig, authentisch, rein, zeitlos, frisch! Eine CD zum Genießen... - zum Sitzen auf der Veranda, bei einem schönen Gläschen Wein, umgeben von den warmen Strahlen der wohligen Frühsommer-Sonne, den Blick über das weite Land schweifen lassend.... - einfach herrlich!

Art-Nr.: 3031
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Country
Status: Programm || Typ: CD || Preis: € 15,90

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